Ali Muhareb

Peace Out to Pony Village

For damn near a decade, Pony Village have become one of the more household names in Portland, despite being named after a mall in North Bend. Lead singer and guitarist Ryan Barber has transposed his memories of growing up in the coastal southern Oregon town into the indie pop songwriting that's gained Pony Village such a cult following. Sadly, fans won't be getting much more from the band since tonight, Pony Village is being laid to rest.

Exactly why their Rontoms Sunday Sessions set tonight will be their last performance ever, we're not sure. We were always able to count on Pony Village, no matter how many lineup changes or other random occurrences popped up. Needless to say, whether they play more shows, make more albums or not, they'll always be a Portland favorite.

Weather permitting, you can catch Pony Village's last show later this evening at Rontoms with Ali Muhareb. As always with their Sunday Sessions events, it's free.

The Hunt is On: Record Store Day 2015

Record Store Day is on Saturday—the best day of the year to stand in line and fight over rare vinyl releases while supporting local businesses. This year, Portland record stores will stock hundreds of RSD exclusive releases, including some local treats.

In October, Blitzen Trapper recorded Neil Young’s Harvest in full at the Doug Fir. Score the live album Live Harvest on Saturday. Listen to their take on “Heart of Gold” before you buy the record.

Eyelids, Portland’s psych-pop super group, are releasing a split 7” with The Phoenix Foundation, produced by Peter Buck.

Pickathon partnered with Easy Sound Recording Company to release a split 7” of Those Darlins and Diarrhea Planet (both from Nashville) recorded live at the festival last summer. Preview the tracks here.

Jackpot Records is releasing a limited edition record of short-lived Portland band No. 2’s No Memory. Mixed by Elliott Smith, the album is “the missing link between the end of Heatmiser and the beginning of Elliott Smith’s major label debut,” according to Jackpot.

In store performances abound throughout the day. Everyday Music on the Westside will feature DJ sets by members of Typhoon, Modern Kin, Laura Veirs, Summer Cannibals, and more, plus performances by Edna Vasquez, Ryan Sollee (Builders and the Butchers), Sam Coomes (Quasi), The Shivas, The Ghost Ease, The Ganders, and the Dandy Warhols. See the full schedule here.

Tender Loving Empire will host an officially unofficial RSD party at their SE Hawthorne store featuring Genders, Ali Muhareb, and Run On Sentence.

Jackpot will pour you free coffee if you peruse their shop or stop in for their DJ sets.

Across town, Music Millennium will host Portland punk legends, Dead Moon.

Make sure you check out early opening times for your favorite record store, and study the release list ahead of time.

Happy Record Store Day!

-Zibby Pillote

Album Review: Mujahedeen by Ali Muhareb

Local professional chiller and former bass player of Talkative, Ali Muhareb just released a solo album, Mujahedeen, and it rips. The album displays a remarkably more dynamic musical genius than was showcased in his role with Talkative, and sounds surprisingly different than his previous group to boot. Sonically resemblant to some stoned fusion of Animal Collective and Hot Chip, Mujahedeen adds a solid new layer to Portland music that contends with the best.... Read the full review here!

My New Favorite Mujahedeen

  classifieds
 

My New Favorite Mujahedeen
- by Travis Leipzig

Local professional chiller and former bass player of Talkative, Ali Muhareb just released a solo album, Mujahedeen, and it rips. The album displays a remarkably more dynamic musical genius than was showcased in his role with Talkative, and sounds surprisingly different than his previous group to boot. Sonically resemblant to some stoned fusion of Animal Collective and Hot Chip, Mujahedeen adds a solid new layer to Portland music that contends with the best.

"Don’t Bother Me" cheerily opens up the album riding drum clicks and a bass riff with a brilliant simplicity that somehow reminds me of Gershon Kingsley’s classic 1968 track "Popcorn." Then layered with rad guitar and a blown out vocal melody you’ll have stuck in your head all day, Mujahedeen is off to a solid start.

The second track, "So Bold" is my favorite on the album. With an almost angelic arpeggiating synth and a crunchy bass riff, Muhareb lures the listener out of their comfort zone into the depths of his psyche, like a steelhead following a spinner out from under some river rock where he was chilling. Then like a seasoned angler, the track hooks you with the hit of gently punching chords, a dope backing vocal sample and a super catchy lead vocal that questions space and time, repeating “it’ll stay like this till we grow old.”  

Another choicest of nuggets on the album is the dark and sluggish closing track "WalkIn" which incorporates some vocal sampling weirdness you’d expect from a Log Across the Washer recording. But it sounds entirely unique with the drone of his, at this point signature fuzzed out keys and bass and melodically repetitious vocal styling.

If you made it out to the Mujahedeen album release at the Firkin Tavern on Saturday night, you’d be a fool to dismiss Ali Muhareb based on the technical difficulty laden performance. It was his first live production of the one-man show and it will only get better. I for one am stoked to watch the evolution of Muhareb’s new project, as his first album is definitely something special.  

 

Ali Muhareb
Mujahedeen

 

 

 
 
 
Syndicate content