DIY/Lo-Fi

Sludge abounds on Spacer's noise-friendly "Red Wolf"

The saturated image of a fleeing canine adorns the cover of Red Wolf, a recent release by New York experimental rock trio Spacer, a fitting image given the effort’s skittish, sometimes wandering internal monologue and its fight-or-flight inducing guitar work. Through sludgey drop tunings with a slight psych influence, Spacer impress on listeners a sense of indefinable external danger, or at the very least a mild malaise, over the course of six tracks, replete with an impressionistic approach to lyricism and distorted, heavy shredding. Visceral and anxiety-inducing, it’s evocative of Boris’ Akuma No Uta, the type of record for those seeking an experimental, noisy release from the city’s current quietude. Stream it below.

Ritual Boys Club's experimental delights on "Fishing in Boon"

New York experimental outfit Ritual Boys Club is a hard group to pin down. Their debut LP Fishing in Roon radiates a wide range of disparate indie subgenera, sometimes simultaneously and authorities in quick succession — droney slowcore can quickly become upbeat jangle jams, math-y breakdowns congeal into twee indie, with the whole project underscored by the pleasant lo-fi hiss of tape recording. It's this drive towards experimentation, towards seeking out inscrutable electric guitar-centric soundscapes, that makes the record so incredibly listenable, twisting at each track towards a new undefined direction, yet unified under the intimacy of Ella Sinskey’s intimate, almost home-recording quality vocals and concise, focused songwriting. Recommended for fans of Avi Buffalo, or perhaps those seeking a quieter band in the vein of Captain Beefheart, give it a listen below. 
 

From the Submissions: Moon Sand Land's "The Duality of Man"

Evenhandedness is the name of the game for New York songwriter Jason Ross. Under the handle Moon Sand Land he impressionistically charts life’s various ups and downs on split EP The Duality of Man, letting recollections of the oceanside views, secret-sharing, and afternoon trysts fall out his mouth in a signature, exasperated drawl while leading a lofi cadre of collaborators in garage rock unison. In line with the EP’s title, there’s an impeccable balance that permeates this project’s duration — the oftentimes frustrated nature of Ross’s emotive vox is cut with the brightness of his instrumental backing, a pleasant blend of shimmering 90s electric guitars and progressive, exciting song structures, which keeps this extended play interesting throughout its four tracks. Give this submission a stream below.

From the Submissions: Otra Vez "Vexations"

Two dudes, a four track, and a singular microphone are the driving force behind vexation, the debut offering by lofi, “tropical country” duo Otra Vez — and that’s really all they needed to make a groovy, kickass record. Endowed by the charm of its palpable crunchiness and compressed vox and available for four dollars and twenty cents on Bandcamp (nice), the album skirts being defined as silly or serious; members DJ O’Loane and Sean O’Hara seamlessly switch between ditties detailing past relationships (“death by 1000 cuts”) and stoney meditations on the virtues of selling out (“fat sandwich”), their detuned guitars and easygoing percussive lines in toe. Recommended for fans of Makeout Videotape, Soko, and John Dwyer deep cuts, give it a listen below, ideally on a rooftop with a couple of buddies, and catch Otra Vez at Our Wicked Lady on April 2nd.. —Connor Beckett McInerney

Luke Rathborne's "Ordinary Woes" is a cinematic trip through the city

A healthy dose of wide-eyed Kubrick stares, scattered hand-drawn animatics, and sunburnt, borderline cacophonous guitars characterize “Ordinary Woes,” the new video by NYC indie performer Luke Rathborne, evoking both the unpleasantry of a psilocybin mushroom trip and the quotidian struggles of being a working artist in the city. While the former of these two experiences was a direct inspiration for Rathbrone’s forthcoming LP Again, the latter is best communicated through the song itself — freeform word associations with combined with a wailing chorus against a breakbeat fuzz-laden instrumental backing places his workmanship somewhere between the scuzzy lofi surf punk of outfits like Wavves, with a distinctive drawling vocal performance that’s reminiscent of 90s slacker rock. Give it a watch and listen below, and keep an eye out for his new LP dropping this June.

Syndicate content