Folk/Country

Trafton’s “Gone” is a cold, lonely affair

It’s easy to imagine yourself in a verdant, lonely locale when listening to the music of East Village-based songwriter Trafton, and new single “Gone” is his coldest, most distant destination yet. Damper-pedaled pianos and an at times whispering falsetto endow this recent offering with visions of wintery woods, a more key-friendly take on the isolation familiar to fans of Bon Iver or Thoreau’s Walden. Within this distance established between Trafton and the listener, however, is a separate, more intrinsic loneliness, the product of a separation between the artist and their now-gone ex-love, as well as a desire to return; Trafton’s parting words implore the individual to “come tell me I’m wrong, and please don’t be gone.” It’s a haunting track that will resonate with fans of folk and good songwriting during this cold December— listen below. —Connor Beckett McInerney

Dusty Winds “I Got High With Santa Claus”

Alt-Country musician Dusty Winds has released a new Christmas single, “I Got High With Santa Claus” b/w “I’ll Call You This Christmas”.

Dusty Winds is the alter-ego of Cory Hance who has played in several bands over the last two decades including The Cells.

Muddy Ruckus offers a haunting brand of Americana, plays Stone Church 12.05

Back in October, Muddy Ruckus released a single pleasantly infectious, a song with a sinister rhythm that haunts. “From The Floor” is led by an ominous banjo riff that is followed by a thumping bassline, marching to the rich harmonies of both Ryan Flaherty and Erika Stahl on guitar and drums respectively. The duo that is Muddy Ruckus takes in this song, and their work at large, a more somber approach to America’s usually upbeat style, and it works. With eerie lyrics like “I’ve been sleeping for so long/ I don’t know what's right from wrong/ I don’t know if I was ever born at all/ Something’s happening again/ Hey man don’t you understand?/ There are voices coming up/ from the floor.” the Americana music the duo produces has a deliciously ghastly tinge. The Auburn, ME, duo will be playing on December 5th at the Stone Church in Brattleboro, VT. Stream “From The Floor” below for something different today. - Rene Cobar, photo by TBERG Photography

Happy Birthday, Deli Magazine New England!

There are so many things to be grateful for today: family, friends, good food, good times. Here at Deli New England, we are grateful for one more thing, and that is the opportunity to cover New England’s always-thriving music scene. For ten years, we have been privileged to witness the rise of talented artists from Connecticut’s New York border to Maine’s Atlantic seaboard. Since the birth of this branch, on this date ten years ago, we have had our many editors explore with delight hip-hop acts, indie-pop darlings, rock-punks, and so much more. Below you will find nine posts from different editors of this magazine over the last ten years. A big thank you to Meghan Chiampa for kicking off this journey and letting me know of the special occasion at hand. Happy holidays and happy reading! - Rene Cobar

Meghan Chiampa on Brendan Hogan (2010)

Chrissy Prisco on Boy Without God (2011)

Dean Shakked on High Pop (2012)

Jake Reed on Deja Carr (2013)

Daniel McMahon on Here We Just Dream (2014)

Zach Weg on And the Kids (2015)

Olivia Sisinni on Dreamtigers (2016)

Cameron Carr on Clairo (2017)

Lilly Milman on People Like You (2018)

Joseph Mcdonald - Excellent New Roots Record "Human Dogs"

Joseph Mcdonald hails from rural Ontario and creates music that represents the countryside perfectly. He just released a new record “Human Dogs” which opens with the title track. It’s a pleasant sounding roots tune with a nice melody and acoustic guitar. The album features some excellent pedal steel work that’ll make you wanna cry. I recommend listening to Human Dogs and it will help you escape the busy city life. Mcdonald’s main inspirations are Willie Nelson, John Prine and Roger Miller and you can’t go wrong with any of those selections. “Human Dogs” available now! – Kris Gies

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