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A Deli Premiere: "A Step Back from the Wrong Direction" by Josh Knowles

Boston’s Josh Knowles gives sound to a time filled with tragedies, abysmal confusion, and above all else, profound hope for a better world. In his new record, A Step Back from the Wrong Direction, Josh uses his skills with an electric violin to craft evocative string music that stimulates the heart and mind with each swell and beautiful cadence. “A Step Back from the Wrong Direction: II” is a prime example of the ambiances the music immerses the listener in, cautious, almost as if stepping stealthily, the song creates a sense of peril that is both grave and familiarly comfortable. “A Step Back from the Wrong Direction: IV” seems more cheery, almost like the calm after a raging storm, back and forth the sounds rise like sea spume so majestic. Overall, Josh Knowles offers New England the kind of music that makes the most sense today: a type of music meant for contemplation, discovery, and healing. We are thrilled to premiere the record for you below; your weekend will be the better for it. - Rene Cobar

Flying Vipers cool down for the summer with "Pandemic Versions"

While in quarantine, Flying Vipers, a group hailing from Waltham, MA, took the time to unearth a couple of old tapes that are now a double trouble remastered set of singles for all to enjoy. The instrumental reggae compositions are just what is prescribed, for the hot summer: with their relaxed-confident rhythms and cool embellishments of sparkling keys, they can cool down the body and mind. The additional production work on the singles is evident, with delays creating a more robust listening experience and an ambiance pleasant and intriguing. The trip may be a short one, but it is a good one, stream both singles below right now. - Rene Cobar

Unnamed Colors show pure class in new record "Be Where I Am"

Every once in a while, the week does not start with a bang, but rather it eases in with grace and much a soothing energy: that can be said of Be Where I Am, a new record from Newburyport’s Unnamed Colors. Each piano-led track is honeyed with glossy electric guitar embellishments, swinging rhythms, and the impressive vocals of Sierra Partlan, which take the classy music to the next level of finesse. “Come and Go” is an excellent example of the group’s ability to sway the sonic winds of arpeggiating guitars and rapid drum fills into a whirlwind worth admiring. “Come Play with Me” shows off the jazzy elements of Unnamed Colors, so exquisite and supported by a skilled bassline that buries itself in the heart of the listener. For each day we wake to there is something of a promise made that today will be better than yesterday, with Be Where I Am in your ears you are well on your way to a promise kept; stream the upbeat track “Kindling” from the new record below. - Rene Cobar

Adam Reczek scores indie short film "The Bar Fly"

Digging up some tunes today, we stumbled across “The Bar Fly,” the short and sweet instrumental by New Hampshire’s Adam Reczek; the song accompanies a movie of the same name, written and directed by artists from northern New Hampshire and Vermont. The instrumental is a cool meltdown with electric guitars that languidly ring out, a bass that crawls beautifully, and snaps that add a relaxed rhythm. There is not much more you can ask of the song, nor would you want to, but it does add curiosity for the movie it is attached to; stream “The Bar Fly” below for a respite from the world. - Rene Cobar, photo by Empire Imaging

Dogs on Shady Lane reflects on sweet and sour notes in new single "18"

Something dreamy, something sad—that is the glow that radiates from “18,” the new indie-folk single from Providence’s Dogs on Shady Lane. The acoustic guitar strums that softly thread about during the track begin to brighten as dreamy electric guitar accents pile up, and the reverbed vocals of project leader Tori Hall gently reflect on life and its sweet and sour melodies. Refrains such as “thick as brick but stick stone, hurt/me less than silence and warn/but burning hands mend me like wool, so feel me up/I’m too old to be crying so much” hint at strength and vulnerability, at the physical and its memory. The new track by Dogs on Shady Lane has in it all the charm of the indie-folk genre: escapist sounds you can drift away to and lyrics that ground you to a reality you help to shape; if you need a moment away from your busy Monday, we have it for you streaming below. - Rene Cobar, photo by Kannetha Brown

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