best-emerging-bands-artists

Clairo's star rises quickly with debut record, show set for XL Center 08.04

If you have not heard of Boston’s Clairo, you soon will: the young artist is seeping into the pages of major publications like The Guardian with her debut record Immunity. Clairo is set to seriously shake up the pop hierarchy with her lively brand of synth-pop music. Don’t just imagine synth-driven tunes, picture energetic indie-rock guitar riffs, groovy drumbeats and the reverb-tinged vocals of a young woman ready to let her emotions spill across the mainstream. Clairo’s record is a sonic chameleon taking on the best colors of today’s music landscape: Immunity has the trap beats that currently surge in Chicago, the electro-rock bubbling in New York City and the ever-vibrant pop glaze of Los Angeles. You will want to catch this artist before she is out of reach, and the XL Center in Hartford is the place to do that on August 4th. We are streaming the red hot track “Bags” from the new record below. - Rene Cobar

The Deli Philly’s August Record of the Month: Ruby Puff Of Dust - Honey Radar

Instantly stepping into a dissonant riff, “Kite Balloons” kicks off Honey Radar’s fifth full-length album, Ruby Puff Of Dust, which was released via What's Your Rupture?. The ragged, guitar-fueled inferno momentarily subsides with the vocals serving as a gentle, guiding, cooling agent. That mixture of unrestrained fire and its refreshing counterpart exhibits control within the chaotic setting, before “Tick Tock” rhythmically revs its engines and then snaps into gear with the crack of the snare. A continuous march forward gradually shifts and amplifies in intensity, as mastermind Jason Henn narrates an oddly intriguing scene. “Curve-less doctors cover you in spit. Don’t let anybody know it.”

However, a subdued softness marinates in “Song For Randolph Free”. Walking along a dusty, time-worn trail, there’s a memorable, conversational closeness that takes a personal look, before allowing the muscularity of guitar to round out the moment, supporting action to take the place of words. The wheel aggressively rolls on as “Carousel Society” instrumentally opens up. A pleasant yet cautionary tone is echoed in the lyrics. “All is good for you and me, let’s help the world enter the sun.” The track demonstrates the ability to stir and soothe, fading away before reviving into a gritty, groovin’ stomp.

While “Almanac Singer” enchants in a poetic prose haze, encircled by the hard-driving electric spark plug of instrumentation, one meanders slowly toward “Magnesium Blow-Up,” which is already in progress, with the decibel level subsequently rising. Loosely held together, a hypnotic heaviness gradually spins outward into the distance, returning and completing its cycle in acoustic form. “Smoking Boy” jumps out of the box, driven by the entanglement of steadily popping drums and wiry guitar, as the vocals etch a tunnel through the center, before drifting into the unknown as the song subsides.

“The Golden String” concludes this collection of garage-psych vignettes, with its slightly off-kilter, mystical haziness. It rides along and then goes off-roading, twisting ever further into unknown. While proving to be Honey Radar’s most pop-oriented record, Henn and company still manage to pack in plenty of surprises. – Michael Colavita 

Fire in the Field delivers a sticky-sweet summer single, plays Jewel Music Venue 08.09

The duality of Boston's Fire in the Field is overwhelming: the sharp contrast between the group's sensual lyrics and killer rock riffs is a recipe for a complete mind takeover. The funk flows abundantly in the band's latest single "Under the Sun" as a groovy drum beat and stylish electric guitar strums flourish. The panache with which the lead vocals switch from a swagger-filled modulation to sensible falsettos recall the glory of Prince's '80s heyday. The band delivers a single gooey with style and confidence, and it is bringing all of that to the Jewel Music Venue in Manchester, NH on August 9th. We are streaming the new single for you below. - Rene Cobar

New Slaughter Beach, Dog LP Available for Streaming & Purchase

Slaughter Beach, Dog's new LP Safe And Also No Fear officially comes out on vinyl tomorrow via Lame-O Records, but you can now stream and purchase it digitally below. Pulling influences from musicians such as Wilco and gothic Americana writers like Raymond Carver and Cormac McCarthy, there is an obvious evolution to the songwriting of Jake Ewald that fans of Modern Baseball should take notice of almost immediately. With the band's lineup solidified by Nick Harris (NONA, LUTHER, All Dogs) on guitar, Zack Robbins (Dark Mtns, Superheaven, Petal) on drums, and former MoBo bassist Ian Farmer, you'll find the songs on Ewald's latest album to be more spacious and deliberate, with a shadowier side to their tales. Slaughter Beach, Dog is also scheduled to perform next in Philly on Saturday, September 21 at the First Unitarian Church, supported by Cave People. (Photo by Jess Flynn)

Still's "Control" is a haunting romantic rumination

Still's debut single, "Divinity," seemingly came out of nowhere—the trio delved into the melodic side of post-punk with its ringing, layered guitars and robust rhythm section.  Their latest single, "Control," also adopts a trebly, shimmering sound that comes across like the work of a full band rather than an intimate bedroom recording—an anomaly for a contemporary band that adopts an eighties guitar-pop style. There's an-all-embracing romanticism to lead singer Daniel McDonough's passionate admission: "Embers rising from a fire / You burned it all down so your past selves would die," he sings in a tender falsetto, showcasing his commanding range over a beautifully arranged balance of delicate synth lines and just the right amount of reverb—very much in the tradition of songwriters like Gerard "Caesar" McInulty and Mark Burgess. - Juan Rodríguez

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