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A Deli Premiere: "A Step Back from the Wrong Direction" by Josh Knowles

Boston’s Josh Knowles gives sound to a time filled with tragedies, abysmal confusion, and above all else, profound hope for a better world. In his new record, A Step Back from the Wrong Direction, Josh uses his skills with an electric violin to craft evocative string music that stimulates the heart and mind with each swell and beautiful cadence. “A Step Back from the Wrong Direction: II” is a prime example of the ambiances the music immerses the listener in, cautious, almost as if stepping stealthily, the song creates a sense of peril that is both grave and familiarly comfortable. “A Step Back from the Wrong Direction: IV” seems more cheery, almost like the calm after a raging storm, back and forth the sounds rise like sea spume so majestic. Overall, Josh Knowles offers New England the kind of music that makes the most sense today: a type of music meant for contemplation, discovery, and healing. We are thrilled to premiere the record for you below; your weekend will be the better for it. - Rene Cobar

Gavin Caine debuts breezy record "Nine Stories"

Last month, Boston’s Gavin Caine released a record that feels like a cool, sweet ocean breeze on a summer day: Nine Stories is a refreshing look at the life of an artist joyous to share and remember. “Jenny’s Library” is fun, piano-driven, Americana goodness while “Summer Rain” has a tinge of folk to it highlighted by beautiful string work, and fluttering piano notes. “The Lady at the Checkout” is energetic and so easy to follow in both its thumping rhythm and colorful storytelling. Each song, and for that matter story, that Caine pens radiates serious sincerity and light-hearted memories. For an unexpectedly good Tuesday, stream the indie-rock single "Diner Girl" below. - Rene Cobar

A Deli Premiere: "Racket" by New Threads

Wasting no time and keeping the machine running hot, New Threads debuts the music video for its single “Racket” whose rhythm trots tough. The new alt-rock track lets the guitars rip to visuals of tennis greats like Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic and, like a good tennis match that it is, you can’t take your eyes off it. The group recently released its single “Schlitz,” letting no pandemic stop the work, and now with the furious jam that is “Racket,” New Threads solidifies its drive and emphasizes its sound. Both singles are part of the group’s upcoming seventh studio album, which will be released via the band’s label Pink Hat Records. Recording together, running a label, and rocking out—New Threads is as involved as any New England act. We are delighted to premiere “Racket” for you below; ride towards the weekend at full volume. - Rene Cobar

Farmertan debuts second act of sonic play "Muse of Fire"

Connecticut outfit Farmertan returns with the second act of its sonic play Muse of Fire, which enters a new chapter revved up and hot for noise. While the first act surely had its gritty rock moments, this second act kicks off with tracks like “Man of the Hour,” which sprints across its nearly four minutes of lingering-distorted chords, spirited drum fills, and oh-so subtle bassline with the velocity alternative rock demands. “The Storm” slows down some but is still powered by fuzzy guitar riffs and reverberated vocals that match the characteristics of the music; the guitar solo in the track is killer. “After” is the most melodic of the songs, gritty and fueled up still but with a cool strut to it that closes the act splendidly. Overall this continuation makes evident that this sonic play is well underway and that the last act is worth sticking around for; stream the second act below for a solid Tuesday playlist. - Rene Cobar

Delaney is not afraid to mix it up in new record "A Small Remaining Quantity of Something"

Manchester, New Hampshire, group Delaney has a new record that explodes with all the emocore goodness you desire for a celebratory weekend. A Small Remaining Quantity of Something contains tracks like “The Ghost of Better Times,” which pops with mighty harmonizing choruses, drum fills for days and even atmospheric breaks for a breather before the mosh madness. The group goes beyond the garage aesthetic with layered tracks like “Thief,” which add piano embellishments to back the melodic vocals, soaked in melancholy, and, yes, the song erupts too. “Broken” is no-holds-barred rock and roll, showcasing the versatility that has always made emocore a beloved and seemingly unforgettable music genre. For a weekend to remember stream A Small Remaining Quantity of Something below. - Rene Cobar

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