newengland

Flying Vipers cool down for the summer with "Pandemic Versions"

While in quarantine, Flying Vipers, a group hailing from Waltham, MA, took the time to unearth a couple of old tapes that are now a double trouble remastered set of singles for all to enjoy. The instrumental reggae compositions are just what is prescribed, for the hot summer: with their relaxed-confident rhythms and cool embellishments of sparkling keys, they can cool down the body and mind. The additional production work on the singles is evident, with delays creating a more robust listening experience and an ambiance pleasant and intriguing. The trip may be a short one, but it is a good one, stream both singles below right now. - Rene Cobar

The Macrotones are soulful in new EP "Bloody Hands"

Boston’s The Macrotones are a quality group, and that shows in the band’s latest EP Bloody Hands, which delves into the mythos of R&B, soul, and funk to retrieve a sound that has all the grit and glamour of ‘70s underground afrobeat clubs. The title track is led by a robust bassline that slithers in sync with the serrated vocals and snappy beat that add flame to it. “Nighttime Persona” uses brass instrumentation and vibrant, lingering electric guitar work to embellish a song smooth and soulful. The Macrotones find in these tracks the blues edge that artists like Fantastic Negrito and Gary Clark Jr. so effortlessly have.  “All Intentions Hidden” packs the full spirit of a group that does not fear to lose itself in the music it creates; For the right sort of trip stream the bluesy “Snakehunter” below. - Rene Cobar

Unnamed Colors show pure class in new record "Be Where I Am"

Every once in a while, the week does not start with a bang, but rather it eases in with grace and much a soothing energy: that can be said of Be Where I Am, a new record from Newburyport’s Unnamed Colors. Each piano-led track is honeyed with glossy electric guitar embellishments, swinging rhythms, and the impressive vocals of Sierra Partlan, which take the classy music to the next level of finesse. “Come and Go” is an excellent example of the group’s ability to sway the sonic winds of arpeggiating guitars and rapid drum fills into a whirlwind worth admiring. “Come Play with Me” shows off the jazzy elements of Unnamed Colors, so exquisite and supported by a skilled bassline that buries itself in the heart of the listener. For each day we wake to there is something of a promise made that today will be better than yesterday, with Be Where I Am in your ears you are well on your way to a promise kept; stream the upbeat track “Kindling” from the new record below. - Rene Cobar

New Threads offers up a refreshing alt-rock single in "Schlitz"

“Schlitz” is just the type of feel-good story we need for the weekend ahead: the song is over six minutes of summer-scented alternative rock recorded by Boston’s New Threads in three different parts of Massachusetts. Jacob Keplinger (guitar, vocals, keys), Justin Siegel (drums, vocals), James Siegel (bass, vocals) did not allow the pandemic to disrupt the connection they share nor the creativity that propels the group, and we all get to reap the rewards of that. “Schlitz” has a jam feel to it as it switches rhythms and flashes distinctive guitar riffs that feel refreshing and have a slight acidity to them—the song is a cool summer beverage. Sprinkling mint-cool elements of jazz and psych, New Threads offers a funky track you will want to take in slowly; recorded a la 2020 and perspiring a better tomorrow, “Schlitz” is streaming below. - Rene Cobar

Adam Reczek scores indie short film "The Bar Fly"

Digging up some tunes today, we stumbled across “The Bar Fly,” the short and sweet instrumental by New Hampshire’s Adam Reczek; the song accompanies a movie of the same name, written and directed by artists from northern New Hampshire and Vermont. The instrumental is a cool meltdown with electric guitars that languidly ring out, a bass that crawls beautifully, and snaps that add a relaxed rhythm. There is not much more you can ask of the song, nor would you want to, but it does add curiosity for the movie it is attached to; stream “The Bar Fly” below for a respite from the world. - Rene Cobar, photo by Empire Imaging

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